Working with Supplemental Questions User Guide

Last Update: May 9, 2022

This user guide pertains to configuring optional CCCApply Supplemental Questions for the Standard, Noncredit, and International applications.

Contents

Getting Started with Supplemental Questions

Supplemental questions are optional, extra questions that colleges can configure to display on a page within the CCCApply Standard, Noncredit, and International Applications.

Supplemental questions are written in XML and validated with XSD. You can create one or more sets of supplemental questions to be added to your college's CCCApply applications via the CCCApply Administrator tool. Only one supplemental question set can be active/displayed at a time. The Configuring Application Supplemental Questions section of the CCCApply Administrator User Guide provides details on importing, updating, and exporting your Supplemental Question XML files.

If you want supplemental questions to display in both or all three CCCApply applications, you must configure and import separate XML files for each application.

Note: The Noncredit application is a workflow and subset of the CCCApply Standard applications questions that skips the residency and military questions for students who are only taking noncredit courses. See the Noncredit Application section of the CCCApply Standard & Noncredit Application Data Dictionary for more details.

When you have your XML file ready, you import your XML supplemental questions in the CCCApply Administrator and then activate and deactivate question set(s) as you wish.

Screenshot of the Supplemental Questions module summary page in the CCCApply Administrator.

 

 

Understanding Active And Not Active Question Sets

After you have uploaded a set of supplemental questions, there are three factors that determine whether that set will show up in your college's student application:

  • The Status (Active or Non Active)

  • The Effective Date

  • The Status and Effective Dates of other question sets you have previously uploaded

If you marked a previously-uploaded set of supplemental questions as Not Active in the Administrator, that set will not show up on your college's application, regardless of any other factors. Similarly, a future-dated set of supplemental questions will not display until the future date becomes the present date, regardless of other factors. If you have only a single set of questions, then marking it Active and setting the effective date to today or earlier will cause that set to show up in your college's application.

Multiple supplemental question sets require some management. For example, if your supplemental question sets have different effective dates, the set with the most recent Effective Date (that is not in the future) takes precedence over any others. If you have multiple supplemental question sets with the same effective date, then the set with the lowest Page ID number will take precedence.

Consider the following example that shows questions that have been imported into the Supplemental Questions module in the CCCApply Administrator application.

Screenshot showing a list of the college's Supplemental Questions XML pages in the CCCApply Administrator.

If today were March 8, 2016, the questions with Page ID 9 would show up on your college's CCCApply Standard student application. Page ID 10 would not show up, because although it is marked Active and has the latest effective date, that date would be in the future (assuming March 8, 2016 as an example). When the date became April 25, 2016 Page ID 10 would take precedence and the questions on Page ID 9 would no longer display on the application.

If Page ID 9 and Page ID 10 had the exact same Effective Date, then Page ID 9 would take precedence as the set with the lowest Page ID number is used in this scenario.

Note: If you have used supplemental questions in the past, you may notice that the <SupplementalQuestions> element contains an EffectiveDate attribute. This attribute has no effect on your supplemental questions. The system simply ignores it.

Note: When you upload a set of questions, there is a potential 25-minute delay before they appear on the student application. In the live environment, you won't notice this delay, as you will have uploaded your questions well in advance. But it will be noticeable during your testing phase in your Pilot environment. After you upload your test questions, wait 25 minutes before attempting to see them on your student application.

 

Working with XML

Although working with computer languages can be daunting, you don't need to be an expert to create supplemental questions for your college's student application, and you don't need any sophisticated tools. A simple text editor and a rudimentary understanding of XML hierarchy will be helpful.

If you are comfortable writing computer software, you can of course use the tools that best suit you. Otherwise, create your XML files using your operating system's built-in text editor. On Windows, the text editor is called Notepad, and on OSX, it is called TextEdit.

Note: These applications can work with file formats other than plain text. Be sure to save your files in plain text format.

Important: Unless you have experience working with text editors and XML, do not use XMLNotepad to edit your files. It adds extra characters to the beginning of the file that will prevent your XML from uploading. If you do have experience in this area, use XMLNotepad to edit your XML (to take advantage of the schema), then use a plain text editor or some other suitable tool to remove the extra characters (the BOM) before uploading.

Most of the contents of your XML file will depend on the questions you want to ask and the responses you expect to receive. For details on creating questions and guiding the student through the application process see Supplemental Questions: Layout And User Experience and Supplemental Questions: Response Elements.

 

Setting up Your XML File

  1. Copy and paste the example starter XML file structure below into your XML editor before you begin creating questions. This text will serve as your XML base and you can use it over and over again for each new supplemental question XML file set.

?xml version ="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<SupplementalQuestions xmlns:xsi="http://xmlns.cccnext.org/apply" CollegeId="nnn" CollegeName="My College" ApplicationType="Either Standard or Noncredit">
</SupplementalQuestions>

2. Set CollegeId to your college's three-digit MIS code. If you are creating questions for multiple colleges in a district, then indicate the MIS codes of all of the applicable colleges, separated by commas.

3. Set CollegeName to the name of your college.

You will define your questions by inserting XML code in the blank space in the above example.

For example:

<?xml version ="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<SupplementalQuestions xmlns:xsi="http://xmlns.cccnext.org/apply"
CollegeId="611" CollegeName="Allan Hancock College" ApplicationType="Noncredit">

 <Header>Tell us more about yourself!</Header>
<Section>
<YesNo id="1">
 <Label>While attending classes, do you intend to work more than 40 hours per week?</Label>
 </YesNo>
 </Section>

</SupplementalQuestions>

Important: The example above is a complete and legal definition of a supplemental questions page. However, you will need to:

  • Replace the CollegeId and CollegeName values with those of your own college

  • Set the ApplicationType attribute to either "Standard" for the CCCApply Standard application or "Noncredit" for the Noncredit application.

Important: It is very important that your uploaded XML file be error-free. If there are errors in your supplemental questions XML file, you will likely see an error message in the Administrator when you attempt to upload it.

It is strongly recommended that before uploading, you validate your XML with a free, online validator tool such as Free Formatter. This site allows you to copy and paste your XML or XSD for syntax checking. *The maximum size limit for file upload is 2 megabytes.

After you paste your XML and click validate, the site will ask you to copy and paste a second file. In industry jargon, the file it is requesting is called a schema. You can copy the schema from here and paste it into the validator. The validator then tells you if there are problems with your XML. Although the error messages may still be somewhat intimidating, this particular validator will at least show you in a friendly way where the error is in your XML.

 

Supplemental Questions: Layout And User Experience

For supplemental questions, there are a number of elements available that relate to the layout of the application and the applicant's user experience, as opposed to managing the raw data of the applicant's responses. This section provides detailed information about the layout-related elements with example pairs of XML and the resulting display in the application.

These elements fit into two groups:

  • Layout Elements: Header, Indent, and Section;

  • Prompt Elements: Label, HoverHelp, and Translations.

Additionally, there are several attributes available for response elements that relate to guiding the student through the application process. These are the default, required, and title attributes. The following descriptions and examples show how to use these items.

Layout Elements: <Header>, <Indent>, and <Section>

The <Header> element creates a heading for the whole page, as well as for any sections you define for the page.

The <Indent> element offsets portions of the page for readability or hierarchical display.

The <Section> element groups other elements visually on the page. See the examples below for details.

User Prompt Elements: <Label>,<HoverHelp>, and <Translations>

Both <Label> and <HoverHelp> are used only as child elements of the response elements. The <Label> element can be thought of as the question being asked for a response element, while the <HoverHelp> element can be used to provide further explanatory text when the applicant clicks the Help icon next to the related input field. Multiple <HoverHelp> children are allowed, one for each language your student application supports. The optional <Translations> element allows you to specify English or Spanish language (internationalize) for your questions. You must include at least two <Locale> elements, one with a <lang> attribute of "es" and one without, as well as a message block.

Sample XML: Adding the XML code below to your starter XML from the previous section will create:

  • A page header

  • Two sections of checkbox questions, each with its own header

  • Two checkboxes indented to the right from those above and below

  • One check box with hover help in both English and Spanish


<Header>Tell us more about yourself!</Header>

<Section>

<Header>Are you interested in any of the following extracurricular activities? Check all that apply.</Header>

<Checkbox id="1"><Label>Chess club</Label></Checkbox>

<Checkbox id="2"><Label>Athletic sports</Label></Checkbox>

<Indent>

<Checkbox id="3"><Label>As a participant</Label></Checkbox>

<Checkbox id="4"><Label>As an observer</Label>

<HoverHelp lang="en">Check this box if you enjoy watching sporting events</HoverHelp>

<HoverHelp lang="es">Marque si te gusta ver los eventos deportivos</HoverHelp>

</Checkbox>

</Indent>

<Checkbox id="5"><Label>Online gaming</Label></Checkbox>

<Checkbox id="6"><Label>Martial arts</Label></Checkbox>

</Section>

<Section>

 <Header>Check all that apply to your employment status:</Header>

 <Checkbox id="7"><Label>Overworked</Label></Checkbox>

 <Checkbox id="8"><Label>Underpaid</Label></Checkbox>

</Section>

Screenshot above shows an example format and layout of two supplemental questions sections displayed in English.
Screenshot above shows an example format and layout of two supplemental questions sections displayed in English.
Screenshot showing the example format and layout of two supplemental question sections displayed in Spanish.
Screenshot above shows an example format and layout of two supplemental questions sections displayed in Spanish.

To avoid unnecessary errors, do not embed html tags inside text, such as <br>, and do not place text outside an element <>.

 

The application will use the <HoverHelp> tag that applies to the currently-selected language. Only English (lang=”en”) and Spanish (lang=”es”, for Español) are supported. The hover help appears when the applicant hovers the mouse over the checkbox.

This hover help from the example above will appear when the page is in English mode: <HoverHelp lang="en">Check this box if you enjoy watching sporting events</HoverHelp>

Screenshot showing an example of hover help configured in English for a checkbox question.

This hover help from the example above will appear when the page is in Spanish mode: <HoverHelp lang="es">Marque si te gusta ver los eventos deportivos</HoverHelp>

Screenshot showing an example of hover help configured in Spanish for a checkbox question.

Warning: You must specify a language (using the lang attribute as in the examples above) for your hover help or your Supplemental Questions tab will fail and the applicant will see an error message rather than your supplemental questions.

 

Internationalization: The Optional <Translations> Element

If your college does not choose to internationalize the optional supplemental questions you’ve configured, no action is needed.

If your college has already provided both an English and a Spanish version of supplemental questions manually in the XML, you can continue to leave your XML code as is and both language versions of the question(s) will continue to display.

However, if you implement the internationalization approach below, the supplemental questions will conditionally display in either English or Spanish, based on the end-user's browser language setting.


To internationalize your custom supplemental questions:

  • Add the optional <Translations> element.

  • Within the <Translations> element, add at least two <Locale> elements, one without any "lang" attribute and one with a lang attribute of "es".

  • Add <Message> element blocks for each code into both of the <Locale> elements.

    • Each <Message> element must have a <code> and <message> attribute with values.

    • The <code> attribute value must match the question's <Label> value.

For example, for the two <Label> elements and three <label> attributes below:

 

 <Header>main.header</Header>
 <Section>

 <Header>section.1.header</Header>

 <Text maxLength="50" default="" id="1">

 <Label>question.name</Label>

 <HoverHelp lang="en">Enter your full name</HoverHelp>

 <HoverHelp lang="es">Ingrese su nombre completo</HoverHelp>

 </Text>

 <Menu id="1">

 <Label>question.color</Label>

 <MenuItem value="1" label="question.color.1"/>

 <MenuItem value="2" label="question.color.2"/>

 <MenuItem value="3" label="question.color.3"/>

</Menu>

 </Section>

 

...each has a corresponding <Message code="" message=""/> in the <Translations> element's <Locale> element; the first in English and the second in Spanish:

<Translations>

 <Locale>

 <Message code="main.header" message="Here are some questions"/>

 <Message code="section.1.header" message="Knowledge (en and es)"/>

 <Message code="여행지 추천 설문지 | where to go " message="What is your name?"/>

 <Message code="question.color" message="What is your favorite color?"/>

 <Message code="question.color.1" message="Red"/>

 <Message code="question.color.2" message="Blue"/>

 <Message code="question.color.3" message="Yellow"/>

 </Locale>

 <Locale lang="es">

 <Message code="main.header" message="Aquí hay algunas preguntas." />

 <Message code="section.1.header" message="Conocimiento"/>

 <Message code="여행지 추천 설문지 | where to go " message="¿Cuál es su nombre?"/>

 <Message code="question.color" message="¿Cuál es su color favorito?" />

 <Message code="question.color.1" message="Rojo" />

 <Message code="question.color.2" message="Azul" />

 <Message code="question.color.3" message="Amarillo" />

 </Locale>

 </Translations>


Response Element: The Default Attribute

Depending on your specific circumstances, you can allow the applicant to ignore a given question, or you can require the applicant to provide a response. If you allow a question to be ignored, the system will store a system-default value for the question. The legal default values depend on the response element you specified. When you add a default attribute to a response element, the system auto-answers the question with the default value you specify. When the page appears, the question displays as already answered:

<Section>

 <Header>Examples with the "default" attribute:</Header>

 <Checkbox id="29" default="checked"><Label>I would like to be contacted concerning financial aid.</Label></Checkbox>

 <Text id="20" default="Mozart"><Label>Name a few of your favorite composers:</Label></Text>

</Section>


The following table shows the legal defaults for each response element.

Response Element

Element Legal Default

Response Element

Element Legal Default

Checkbox

"checked" or "unchecked"

CountryList

Any of the two-character country codes in the Data Dictionary (Standard or International) Date See note below.

Menu

The contents of the value attribute in any of the <MenuItem> elements you create for the menu. See The <Menu> Element for details.

PhoneNumber

 

StatesList

Any of the two-character state codes in the Data Dictionary for the application (Standard or International).

Text

Any free-form text less than the maximum length of 250 characters, or less than the maximum you set using the maxLength attribute.

YesNo

"yes" or "no"

Note: It is recommended that you do not set a default for a <Date> element, as it will malfunction on the student application page.

Note: Because a response is automatically filled in when you set a default, setting required"=true” will have no effect. The applicant can simply ignore the question, in which case the default you have supplied will be stored in the database when the student submits the application.

 

Response Element: The required Attribute

The required attribute allows you to require that the applicant respond to selected response elements, or to groups of response elements. To require responses to all the elements in a section, use required"=tru"e in the <Section> element. For an example, see the discussion of the title attribute below. To require responses to an individual element, use required"=true” in that element.

The following is an example of a <CountryList> element that requires the applicant to select a country:

<CountryList id="3" required="true" title="Your country of birth">
 <Label>Select the country in which you were born.</Label>
</CountryList>

Screenshot showing an example of a country list question in its default state.

The system will not allow the applicant to continue the application process if no country is selected. Instead, an error message will be displayed:

Screenshot showing an example of the error message displayed when the country menu option is not selected in the required question is not answered in the application user interface.

Note: The title attribute allows you to customize the error message somewhat, to make it easier for the applicant to understand the nature of the error. It is best to supply a title for every response node; see The title Attribute section above for details.

Note: For <Checkbox> elements, required"=tru"e means that the applicant must mark the check box. This applies to <Checkbox> elements within a <Section> that has required"=tru"e, as well as individual <Checkbox> elements that have required"=tru"e. This might be useful for requiring the applicant to read the application carefully or agree to some specific terms:

<Checkbox id="11" required="true" title="Your agreement to the contract">
<Label>I agree to the terms and conditions of the contract.</Label>
</Checkbox>

 

Response Element Attribute: The title Attribute

The title attribute allows you to give names to response elements to make certain error messages more intelligible to the applicant. Consider the following example, in which the <Section> element contains required"=tru"e. This means all of the yes/no questions in the section must be answered.

<Section required="true">
 <Header>While you attend classes, do you intend to...</Header>
 <YesNo id="1"><Label>...work more than 40 hours per week?</Label></YesNo>
<YesNo id="2"><Label>...enroll in a vocational education program (VEP)?</Label></YesNo>
 <YesNo id="3"><Label>...care for children or elderly persons in your family?
</Label></YesNo>
<YesNo id="4"><Label>...care for children or elderly persons outside your family?</Label></YesNo>
</Section>

The system will not allow the applicant to continue the application process if any of these questions are left unanswered. Instead, an error message will be displayed:

Screenshot showing an example of a poorly configured error message displayed when a required question is not answered in the application user interface.

It is unlikely that the applicant will understand these errors. It is recommended that you always use the title attribute to make the error message friendlier wherever you require a response.

<Section required="true">
  <Header>While you attend classes, do you intend to...</Header>

 <YesNo id="1" title="The question about your work schedule">
  <Label>...work more than 40 hours per week?</Label>
</YesNo>

  <YesNo id="2" title="The question about your plans for enrolling in a VEP">
<Label>...enroll in a vocational education program (VEP)?</Label>
</YesNo>

 <YesNo id="3" title="The question about your family obligations">
 <Label>...care for children or elderly persons in your family?</Label>
</YesNo>

 <YesNo id="4" title="The question about your non-family care obligations">
  <Label>...care for children or elderly persons outside your family?</Label>
</YesNo>

</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of an error message displayed when a required question is not answered in the application user interface.

 

Supplemental Questions: Response Elements

The response elements are the XML elements that allow you to manage the raw data of supplemental question applicant responses, which are stored in the CCC Tech Center's supplemental questions database.

A response element serves three primary functions:

  • It determines how the question is to be presented to the applicant.

  • It determines the form in which the response data is to be stored.

  • It indicates to the system where in the database to store the response.

Response elements can contain both <Label> and <HoverHelp> child elements to help guide the user through the application process. Certain attributes such as default and required can also be assigned to response elements for guiding the user. See Supplemental Questions: Layout And User Experience for details.

 

Each type of response element is associated with a group of fields in the database. Responses to <Checkbox> elements, for example, are stored in a group of fields whose names follow the pattern of supp_check_ followed by a two-digit number. There are 50 supp_check fields in the database, from supp_check_01 to supp_check_50. The id attribute you assign to each response element will determine which particular field the response is stored in.

For example, the response to <Checkbox id="42"> will be stored in the field called supp_check_42. When you are ready to download student data to your college's Student Information System, you will use these field names to retrieve the data you want.

The following table shows the association between a response element and the supplemental questions database.

Element Name

Database Field Name

Prefix Number of Fields

Element Name

Database Field Name

Prefix Number of Fields

Checkbox

supp_check

50

CountryList

supp_country

5

Date

supp_date

5

Encrypted Text

supp_secret

5

Menu

supp_menu

30

PhoneNumber

supp_phonenumber

5

StatesList

supp_state

5

Text

supp_text

20

YesNo

supp_yesno

30

The database fields for most of these elements have a fixed size. For example, because a <YesNo> element accepts only a yes or a no, the corresponding database field is only one character long, allowing either a "1" for yes or a "0" for no. Some of the response elements correlate to fields that can contain more information. It is not required that you fill a database field, but it is legal to do so.

Element Name

Capacity of Database Field

Element Name

Capacity of Database Field

Menu

60 characters

PhoneNumber

25 characters

Text

250 characters

Below are some details on how to use each type of response element.

 

The <Checkbox> Element

This element creates a simple check box that the applicant can either select or leave untouched, for a simple checked/ unchecked result. Check boxes are typically used in groups, to allow the applicant to provide multiple answers to a single question.

For example:

<Section>
 <Header>Are you interested in any of the following extracurricular activities? Check all that apply.</Header>
<Checkbox id="1"><Label>Chess club</Label></Checkbox>
 <Checkbox id="2"><Label>Athletic sports</Label></Checkbox>
 <Checkbox id="3"><Label>Online gaming</Label></Checkbox>
<Checkbox id="4"><Label>Martial arts</Label></Checkbox>
</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of a checkbox question displayed in the application user interface.

In the database, the example answers in the image above would result in a "0" being stored in supp_check_01 and supp_check_04, while a "1" would be stored in supp_check_02 and supp_check_03.

 

The <CountryList> and <StatesList> Elements

These two elements provide similar functionality but differ slightly in their details. The <CountryList> element creates a drop-down menu that lists the countries recognized by the CCC Tech Center. The <StatesList> element creates a drop-down menu that lists U.S. states and various associated territories. For example:

<Section>
 <Header>CountryList and StateList Examples:</Header>

  <CountryList id="1"><Label>Select the country in which you were born.</Label></CountryList>

 <StatesList id="1"><Label>If you were born in the U.S., select your birth state.</Label></StatesList>

  <CountryList id="2"><Label>Select the country in which your mother was born.</Label></CountryList>

</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of a country and state list question displayed in the application user interface.

This would result in "US" being stored in supp_country_01, "KY" in supp_state_01, and "TH" in supp_country_02. For details on the two-character codes for countries and states, see the data dictionaries for either the Standard or International applications.

 

The <Date> Element

This element creates a text input field that allows for a date in MM/DD/YYYY format. We recommend that you do not use this element; it does not properly validate user input, and can result in invalid values being stored in the database.

 

The <EncryptedText> Element

The EncryptedText element creates a text input field that is a hidden password validator field, displaying asterisks (*) for the characters entered.

Note: Though this element is called EncryptedText, it is not really handling encryption, but is only validating the password the user enters to ensure it matches your regular expression entered in the regex attribute. The data entered by the user in this supplemental question field will be encrypted in the database after they submit their application, and that is where the encryption takes place.

  • The id attribute sets the id for the field. You can have up to five EncryptedText elements.

  • The required attribute can be either true or false. When true, the user is required to enter values in the fields before submission.

  • The reenter attribute can be either true or false. When true, the user must reenter the value in the second field that displays.

  • The maxLength attribute sets the maximum length of the text entry.

  • The regex attribute is where you define the regular expression to be applied to the fields, and validates the user entry to your requirements.

The example below specifies a 6-to-20 character string with at least one digit, one upper case letter, one lower case letter and one special symbol (“@#$%”). You may provide your own regular expression that suits your needs here.

<Section>
<Header>Hidden Password Example:</Header>
<EncryptedText id="1" required="true" reenter="true" maxLength="20" regex="((?=.*\d)(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[@#$%]).{6,20})">
<Label>Temporary Password</Label>
  </EncryptedText>
</Section>

 

The <Menu> Element

This element allows you to create a custom drop-down menu that allows the applicant to select a single item from a list. Use one <MenuItem> child element to define each item in your drop-down menu. The label attribute of <MenuItem> is the text that will display to the user in the drop-down menu. The value attribute indicates the data that will be stored for the selected <MenuItem> element.

For example:

<Section>
 <Header>Custom Menu Example:</Header>
 <Menu id="27">
<Label>Which famous general was defeated at Waterloo?</Label>
<MenuItem value="0" label="Pancho Villa"/>
<MenuItem value="1" label="Sun Tzu"/>
<MenuItem value="2" label="Napoleon"/>
 <MenuItem value="3" label="George Washington"/>
 <MenuItem value="4" label="Philip of Macedon"/>
<MenuItem value="5" label="Water who?"/>
 </Menu>
</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of a dropdown menu question displayed in the application user interface.

The example above would result in the value "2" being stored in <supp_menu_27> in the database. It is best practice, for the sake of simplicity, to use numeric values to represent your menu selections. However, you can use any alphanumeric string up to 60 characters long. Also, although you would typically assign a unique value to each item, it is legal to assign the same value to multiple items. The obvious drawback is that you would not later be able to distinguish between the selections made by applicants, but the system allows you to make this choice if your situation calls for it.

 

The <PhoneNumber> Element

This element allows you to create a box that accepts a phone number, very much like the <Text> element described below. The maximum length for the phone number field is 25 characters and the system will prevent the applicant from typing more than 25 characters into the field.

Beside the system-imposed maximum length, the difference between <PhoneNumber> and <Text> is that <PhoneNumber> allows you to use the <Format> child element to restrict the applicant to a particular phone number format, or set of formats. The applicant can type anything into the field, but the system will halt the application process and display an error if the user attempts to submit the page with a phone number that doesn't match at least one of the specified formats. To allow free-form entry into the phone number field, create a <PhoneNumber> element without any <Format> child elements.

Note: The phone number text field that is rendered in the application has default help text below the text field indicating that the format of (xxx) xxx-xxxx is the acceptable format. If you want to allow for other formats than this hard-coded UI display, it is recommended that you show the applicant the acceptable format(s) in your <Label> element. Naturally, this will be difficult if you allow many different formats. You could minimize wordiness by leaving out the <Format> element altogether, but that will allow the applicant to enter something that isn't a phone number at all. Balance the complexity of your phone number prompts against your college's willingness to accept ill-formatted phone numbers, including input that may not be a phone number at all.

Note: If you use the <Format> child element for a <PhoneNumber>, the application will behave as though you had set required"=true”. That is, the applicant will not be allowed to leave the field blank, even if you set required"=false”. If you wish to allow the field to be left blank, you must leave out the <Format> child element altogether. It is legal, although of limited usefulness, to set required"=true” for a <Format>-less <PhoneNumber> element, because although input would be required, any input, no matter how useless, would be accepted by the application.

<Section>
<Header>Phone Number Examples:</Header>

<PhoneNumber id="1">
 <Label>Enter your home phone number:</Label>
<Format>(999) 999-9999</Format>
 </PhoneNumber>

 <PhoneNumber id="2">
<Label>Enter your cell phone number:</Label>
<Format>(999) 999-9999</Format>
 <Format>999-999-9999</Format>
 <Format>(99) 99 9999 9999</Format>
<Format>99 99 99 99</Format>
</PhoneNumber>

 <PhoneNumber id="3">
<Label>Enter your emergency contact's cell phone number:</Label>
</PhoneNumber>
</Section>

In the example above, the <PhoneNumber> element with the id"="1 would allow a phone number in the one format indicated. The <PhoneNumber> with id"="2 would accept a phone number in any one of the four formats indicated. The <PhoneNumber> with id"="3 would accept any alphanumeric input or keyboard symbols, up to 25 characters long because no child format element is specified. The data entered into the three resulting phone number fields, including spaces and punctuation marks as accepted by their <Format> child elements, would be stored in supp_phonenumber_01, supp_phonenumber_02, supp_phonenumber_03.

 

The <Text> Element

This element allows you to create a box that accepts non-specific keyboard input. While the maximum length for the field is 250 characters, you can further limit the length using the maxLength attribute. Setting this value will prevent the applicant from typing beyond the character limit you have set.

You can also require numeric-only input by using numeric"=tru"e. Setting this attribute will prevent the applicant from typing anything other than digits in the field. It is recommended that you use maxLength whenever you use numeric"=tru"e, to impose an approximately reasonable maximum number that can be entered into the field.

For example:

<Section>
<Header>Manual Input Examples:</Header>

  <Text id="16"><Label>Name a few of your favorite books:</Label></Text>
<Text id="17" default="Mozart"><Label>Name a few of your favorite composers:</Label></Text>

 <Text id="18" default="Parchment fungus" maxLength="50">
<Label>Name a few of your favorite decomposers:</Label> 
</Text>

 <Text id="19" numeric="true" maxLength="2">
<Label>How many school terms do you expect to spend working toward your educational goals?</Label>
</Text>
</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of a text question displayed in the application user interface.

If the student were to submit the application without adding to these input fields, the effect in the database would be as follows:

  • An empty string would be stored in supp_text_16. (The field would be left blank.)

  • "Mozart" would be stored in supp_text_17.

  • "Parchment fungus" would be stored in supp_text_18.

  • And supp_text_19 would be left blank.

Note: Setting numeric"=tru"e affects only the applicant's interaction with the input field, not the content in the database. If, for example, the applicant leaves the field blank, then the corresponding database field (supp_text_19 in the example above) will also be left blank, as opposed to containing a zero.

 

The <YesNo> Element

This element allows you to create a simple yes/no question.

For example:

<Section>
 <YesNo id="1">
<Label>While attending classes, do you intend to work more than 40 hours per week?</Label>
 </YesNo>
</Section>

Screenshot showing an example of a Yes No question displayed in the application user interface.

In the database, a "1" would be stored into supp_yesno_01 if the applicant selected "Yes", or a "0" if the applicant selected.



Screenshots

Image 1: Supplemental Questions Summary Table with Edit Action Icon

 

Image 2: Supplemental Questions Summary Table with Export Action Icon